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Plastic Freedom Challenge August 8 - 15, 2020

In a planet thrown off balance by the pandemic, we need to be conscious of the choices wemake and make way for a recovery that is more sustainable and just.  August 8 is Zero Waste Himalaya Day which marks the beginning of #PlasticFreedomChallenge - our Himalayan Campaign, which calls on you to go a week without plastics, specially the unnecessary ones we can do without. 

#PFC is a response to the unhealthy and unsustainable lives that we are leading evident from The Himalayan Cleanups of 2018 and 2019 which showed that 97 percent of the waste collected was plastic waste, mostly single use. The challenge is a means of self-reflection on our consumption patterns and moving towards sustainable lifestyles. Our #PFC actions also challenge the existing unsustainable production systems and sends a message that producers need to close the tap on plastic pollutionIn a planet thrown off balance by the pandemic, we need to be conscious of the choices we make and make way for a recovery that is m…
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CONCISE VERSION - COMMENTS AND RESPONSES TO UFEPR

Please click here for the downloadable letter.

Comments and Responses to Guideline Document Uniform Framework for Extended Producers Responsibility (Under Plastic Waste Management Rules, 2016) Ministry of Environment, Forest and Climate Change - June, 2020 Comments may be sent at ad.raju@nic.in, gupta.dharmendra@gov.in on or before 31st July, 2020 The Extended Producers Responsibility (EPR) (Under Plastic Waste Management Rules, 2016) is a welcome provision when there has been a dramatic increase in plastic pollution and the inclusion of the industry or producers to take responsibility for their plastic waste is of extreme importance. In India, approx 25,940 tonnes of plastic waste is produced everyday of which a large portion is trashed. A key reason why so much plastic ends up in the trash is because nearly 50% plastic is being made into single-use items (Plastics Oceans International) andno amount of management and recycling will solve the issue unless production systems are made respon…

COMMENTS ON THE DRAFT EXTENDED PRODUCER RESPONSIBILITY FRAMEWORK

Comments and Responses to Guideline Document Uniform Framework for Extended Producers Responsibility (Under Plastic Waste Management Rules, 2016) Ministry of Environment, Forest and Climate Change - June, 2020

The Extended Producers Responsibility (EPR) (Under Plastic Waste Management Rules, 2016) is a welcome provision, the necessity of which cannot be overstated. The dramatic increase in plastic pollution with more and more production of single use plastics has local bodies struggling to keep up beyond their capacities. At such a critical juncture, the inclusion of the industry or producers to take responsibility for the plastic waste they are creating is of high relevance. 
Our submission is divided into an opening statement, general comments with recommendations, and a section detailing out specific edits in the guidelines, wherever possible.
----- Plastic pollution has become one of the most challenging problems that the world is facing currently. Just collection and recycling will not…
The #plasticfreedomchallenge Will you go a week without PLASTICS?                                                 


#PFC - What is it?

#PlasticFreedomChallenge is a call to give up plastics, especially single use plastic for a week- August 8 to 15 to ‘beat plastic pollution’  and take another step towards sustainable lifestyle.
It is a campaign against the use and throw culture, and going plastic free is a move towards mindful consumption.
The #PFC also complements actions of the local self governance institutions and strengthens demands for corporations to take responsibility of their plastic waste.
It is also a continuation of The Himalayan Cleanup, the Brand and Waste Audits.


Why go plastic free?



The world has produced 8.3 billion metric tons of plastics since large-scale production began  in the early 1950s, of which 6.3 billion metric tons were trashed, and all that plastic is now in  landfills or oceans. * A 2018 UNEP report states that ‘If current consumption patterns and waste manage…

The Himalayan Cleanup (THC) Guideline

The Himalayan Cleanup

World Environment Day  ‘Beat Plastic Pollution’
May 26, 2018 IMI/ Zero Waste Himalaya





The idea The Himalayan Cleanup is being organised to focus attention on the problem of waste in the mountains, specifically single use plastic waste. The  Himalayan region, long been portrayed as sacred, pristine and untouched, has a flip side too, of plastic clogged waterways, waste being rolled down hill sides and burnt. The mountains are severely challenged with an ever increasing problem of waste accumulation which is compounded by the fact that many areas in mountain regions are popular tourist destinations, tourism being a major creator of waste. The Himalayan Cleanup aims to bring this growing issue to the fore, through a day dedicated to not only cleaning up our mountains, but also in understanding what is causing the mess.

The cleanup will be carried out simultaneously on May 26, 2018 across the mountain states of India following a uniform guideline, through support and participation of variou…